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Art, For fun, More than science

More Than Science: Art & Science Journal

Update: Sergio Albiac has just sent me my very own Stardust Portrait! Awesome. My face is made of stars.

My portrait reconstructed by Sergio Albiac using images from the Hubble telescope.

My portrait reconstructed by Sergio Albiac using images from the Hubble telescope.

Happy Friday, dear readers! I hope this week has been fruitful for you, and that there is a relaxing and rejuvenating weekend in your near future.

One of the beautiful portraits created by artist Sergio Albiac as part of his Stardust project. http://www.sergioalbiac.com/wall/stardust.html

One of the beautiful portraits created by artist Sergio Albiac as part of his Stardust project.

To inject a little inspiration into your Friday (does Frinspiration work as a word? No?), I’d like to start doing a little something new each week: posting a short article about the crossover between science and technology and other areas of life, like art, education, politics, music, language and fun (‘fun’ sounds like it belongs in a list of subjects, right?).

It is certainly not the case that science belongs only to scientists, i.e. people who ‘do science’ on a regular basis. Science is a part of all of our lives and it doesn’t exist in only one form, confined to a lab bench or a computer terminal. Exploration and understanding of our world is common to all humanity and I think it’s fascinating how people interpret and apply science differently. This new More Than Science series is intended to showcase the myriad of wonderful ways that science and humanity intersect, staying true to the ethos of this website.

First up: Art & Science Journal, which I was only recently introduced to via one of my tumblr followers.

Art and Science Journal logo

This website and print journal bills itself as the place ‘where art and science collide’. From their website:

Established in December 2011, Art & Science Journal is a biannual publication and website based in Ottawa, Canada. Art & Science Journal focuses on artworks concerned with science, nature, and technology. Our mission is to promote, explore, and inspire the wonder that occurs when art and science collide. We strive to be an informative and engaging resource for educators, students, and artscience enthusiasts alike.

The art that Art & Science has been presenting lately is indeed wonderous and includes:

Stardust Portraits – see the first image above – which has been all over my social media news feeds this week. These portraits are generated from photographs emailed to the artist – Sergio Albiac – by anyone who fancies their face made of stars. Sergio has created an automated process that takes images from the Hubble telescope and re-scales those images into a collage of the person’s face. The results are stunning and provide a literal interpretation of the fact that we are all made of stardust. (I submitted a photo earlier this week. When Sergio gets back to me with my very own face galaxy, I promise to post it here.)

A drawing machine piece of artwork from Harvey Moon.

A drawing machine piece of artwork from Harvey Moon.

The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon. Artist Harvey Moon created a machine from a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino (an open-source electronics prototyping platform) that is programmed with an algorithm that tells it how to move a pen across a page to produce a given image. According to this piece about his work, Harvey always had a hard time trying to draw himself, so he created a machine that could do it for him. He creates the rules and systems that operate the Drawing Machine, but he has no control over the finished product, which seems an intriguing method of artistic expression.

One example of the beautiful results is shown to the left.

Harvey is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth.

Finally, Unwoven Light is an installation by artist Soo Sunny Park at the Rice Gallery in Houston. “Composed of 37 individual sculptural units, the installation uses iridescent plexi-glass embedded in pieces of a chain link fence to cast shimmering, colorful reflections across the spacious gallery. The fence-like wire loses its industrial qualities, becoming the framework for something closer to bubbles or butterfly wings.” If I were in Houston, I’d definitely check this out.

unwoven light 1

Unwoven Light by Soo Sunny Park. Photo credit: Peter Harris.

unwoven light 2

Unwoven Light by Soo Sunny Park. Photo credit: Peter Harris.

Until next week, dear readers!

Yours in the pursuit of spaceships,

Bec

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